Zipfer Bier Haus

The third night in Salzburg, we had our third dinner in a beer hall that served locally brewed beer. Do you sense a trend? (Spoiler alert: we had dinner in a beer garden the following night, too.) Ironically, we did not have the Zipfer beer and opted instead to try the Bernstein beer from Kaltenhauser brewery. It wasn’t until the following day that I made the connection that “bernstein” is German for “amber” and this was an amber beer, but there you have it.

Spargelcremesuppe mit Bärlauch Creme

Spargelcremesuppe mit Bärlauch Creme

I started with a bowl of spargelcremesuppe that was topped with a blob of bärlauch creme. I think the creme was creme fraiche (or something similar) with bärlauch added to it. Assuming I can find bärlauch in Virginia, this would be a very easy dish for me to recreate because I’ve already found a good spargelcremesuppe recipe.

Gemuse laibchen

Gemuse laibchen

I’ve already written about how I enjoy faschierte laibchen and have posted the recipe that I use, so I was interested in trying the vegetable version. It did not disappoint. Fried vegetables served with tartar sauce are very popular here (my favorite is fried mushrooms), but I hate frying food at home. My husband says that we’ll get a deep fryer when we return to Virginia and that will hopefully cut down on the smell and splattered oil all over the stovetop. In the meantime, I will work on learning a good tartar sauce.

 

Advertisements

Recipe: Spargelcremesuppe

Despite my initial reluctance to try making this soup (see Cafe Volksgarten Pavillon), I made two batches tonight: one with green asparagus, and one with white. There is no appreciable taste difference between the two, and indeed both soups tasted good.
500 grams (18 oz) asparagus
500 ml (ca. 2 1/8C) vegetable stock or asparagus broth
30 grams (1.1 oz) butter, divided
1 pinch sugar
2 tablespoons flour
100 ml (a little less than 1/2C) white wine
1 egg yolk
200 ml (a little less than 1C) cream
3 pinches of nutmeg
3 pinches of pepper (white)
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 lemon
1. Peel the asparagus and then cut off the heads. Cut asparagus into pieces about 2 cm (3/4″) long.
2. Bring the vegetable/asparagus broth to a boil, then add 1t butter and a pinch of sugar.
3. Add the asparagus pieces to the broth and cook for about 20 minutes. When the asparagus is very tender, remove the soup from the heat.
4. Puree the asparagus and broth mixture.
5. Melt the remaining butter in a sauce pan, then add the flour and fry until the flour turns brown, whisking constantly.
6. Slowly pour in the white wine and whisk. Once the wine is incorporated, add the pureed asparagus soup and bring to a boil. Add the asparagus tips and simmer for about 12 minutes.
7. Whisk the egg yolk with 100 ml cream, then whisk in the remaining cream until the mixture is thick. Gently stir the egg/cream mixture into the soup.
8. Season the soup with lemon juice, pepper, nutmeg, and salt.

Cafe Volksgarten Pavillon

The Austrians are very into seasonal ingredients: for three to four weeks at a time, the current ingredient is found on every menu. It is used to make soups, sauces, seasoning, desserts, etc. Right now the big seasonal ingredient is spargel (asparagus), especially white asparagus. It’s so popular that there are road side stands set up specifically to sell it, complete with signs pointing the way to the stand.

Earlier this afternoon we explored the Volksgarten with the goal of ultimately visiting the Hofburg. We never did make it to the Hofburg but we did have a nice lunch at Cafe Volksgarten Pavillon, located in a corner of the park. For my lunch I had — you guessed it — spargelcremesuppe.

Spargelcremesuppe

Spargelcremesuppe

It was creamy but not overly thick, and tasted strongly of asparagus with a hint of citrus. I enjoyed the soup and I know my kids eat it at school, but I am not sure if I want to learn to make it. I know that we can get white asparagus in Virginia, but I’ve heard it’s woody and not as good as that found in Europe. I might try two batches (one with green and one with white asparagus) to see if there is a considerable taste difference.