Bioladen im G’machl/Tirolerhof

One of my favorite things about visiting the Schönbrunn zoo is the Tirolerhof. The Tirolerhof is the location of a farm house from the Austrian Alpine region of Tirol that was disassembled, transported to the zoo, and reassembled. It serves as a living museum: the rooms are set up as they would be in a typical farm house of the region, and the inside and outside stalls house rare breeds of animals from Tirol.

The farm house at Tirolhof.

The farm house at Tirolhof.

The best part, of course, is the farm shop (Bioladen im G’machl) that sells cured meats, cheese, brötchen sandwiches, baked goods, and beverages from Tirol. We had lunch there yesterday and I’ve discovered two more things that I want to learn how to make.

Powidl topfen kuchen.

Powidl topfen kuchen.

The first is powidl topfen kuchen, a cake made with powidl and topfen. Powidl is kind of like plum jelly, except it is made without adding sugar or pectin (or other gelling agents). It sounds like you boil fresh, late-season plums for hours until they get thick. I want to learn to make this preserve for its own sake, and to re-create this cake. Topfen is a type of cottage cheese that is used in a lot of desserts here. Wikipedia says it is similar to paneer, which I know how to make, so I am a third of the way to knowing how to make this cake.

Mohn zelten.

Mohnzelten.

Next we have mohnzelten, which are poppyseed-filled bread. Wikipedia says that the bread is made with potato dough, which surprised me because I’ve always thought of the bread as a cross between pretzel and sweet bread. This is one of my favorite snacks that I have discovered here, and the way my family gobbled this up yesterday suggests they would not be adverse to me learning how to make them.

Stay tuned for recipes!

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Recipe: Salami Käse, Ei-Champignon, and Landkarree Brötchen

Top left: Salami Käse, Bottom left: Ei-Champignon, Right: Landkarree

Top left: Salami Käse, Bottom left: Ei-Champignon, Right: Landkarree

(See my review of Tauber for the background on these sandwiches.)

SALAMI KAESE

1. Cut a thick (2″) slice of a loaf of fresh bread and butter it.
2. Place a slice of hard boiled egg on one side of the bread, a slice of pickle on the other.
3. Place two slices of cheese in between and slightly overlapping the egg and pickle.
4. Top the egg and pickle with a dollop of sweet butter, and put a couple slices of salami in the middle of the bread.
5. Garnish the dollop of butter on the egg with an olive, and garnish the dollop of butter on the pickle with a tiny sliver of ham, a slice of roasted red pepper, and a sprig of parsley.

EI-CHAMPIGNON*

1. Cut a thick (2″) slice of a loaf of fresh bread and butter it.
2. Spread egg salad (with bits of roasted mushroom and onion in it) over the entire slice of bread.
3. Top the egg salad with a slice of hard boiled egg, a dollop of sweet butter, and a couple roasted mushrooms.
4. Garnish the dollop of butter with a sprig of parsley.

*Champignon is a genus of mushrooms that includes (among 300 varieties) white button mushrooms, which would work well for this sandwich.

LANDKARREE*

1. Cut a thick (2″) slice of a loaf of fresh bread and butter it.
2. Place a piece of crunchy lettuce such as mesclun on one side of the bread, a slice of tomato on the other.
3. Place two slices ham in between and slightly overlapping the lettuce and tomato.
4. Top the lettuce and tomato with a dollop of sweet butter.
5. Garnish the dollop of butter on the tomato with an olive, and garnish the other dollop of butter with a slice of roasted red pepper and a sprig of parsley. Top the ham with mustard and freshly grated horseradish.

*Karree is a type of ham, which presumably comes from the countryside (I believe the translation of “landkarree” is “country ham.”)

Recipe: Matjes, Roast Beef, and Salami Brötchen

L-R: Salami, Roast Beef, and Matjes Brötchen

L-R: Salami, Roast Beef, and Matjes Brötchen

This is more of an assembly guide than recipe, but either way enjoy! (See my review of Tauber for the background on these sandwiches.)

MATJES

1. Cut a thick (2″) slice of a loaf of fresh bread and butter it.
2. Place a piece of crunchy lettuce such as mesclun on one side of the bread, a slice of tomato on the other.
3. Place two slices of boiled egg and a square of herring (preferably Matjes) cut to the width of the bread in between and slightly overlapping the lettuce and egg.
4. Top the lettuce and tomato with a dollop of salty butter (an anchovy butter would go well), and put a triangle of lemon on the fish.
5. Garnish one of the dollops of butter with a small amount of caviar, and garnish the other dollop with a sprig of fresh dill.

ROAST BEEF

1. Cut a thick (2″) slice of a loaf of fresh bread and butter it.
2. Place a slice of tomato on one corner of the bread, and a piece of crunchy lettuce such as mesclun on the other.
3. Place thinly sliced roast beef in between and slightly overlapping the lettuce and tomato.
4. Place a dollop of salty butter on the tomato and the lettuce, and a spoonful of herbed mayonnaise in the middle.
5. Garnish one dollop of butter with a parsley leaf, and the other dollop with a thin slice of red bell pepper. Top with a ring of white onion.

SALAMI

1. Cut a thick (2″) slice of a loaf of fresh bread and butter it.
2. Place a slice of tomato on one end of the bread, a slice of hard boiled egg on the other, and a thinly sliced cucumber in the middle.
3. Place six slices of salami and one slice of cucumber in between and slightly overlapping the tomato and egg.
4. Put a dollop of butter on the tomato and egg.
5. Garnish one dollop of butter with a thin slice of red bell pepper and a parsley leaf, and the other dollop with a slice of pimento-stuffed olive.

Tauber

The first place that we encountered Austrian open-faced sandwiches was at the Hartberger Zeitreise (literally, “time travel”: like a medieval festival, but with some Roman history and a donkey thrown in). The sandwich was simply a piece of dark bread spread with mustard and topped with thick slices of ham and freshly grated horseradish. Simple, but fantastically delicious and surprisingly filling when washed down with a beer.

Brötchen. It looked better before my kids attacked it.

Brötchen. It looked better before my kids attacked it.

I’ve since seen these sandwiches in various places, most recently at the Easter markets. They are always delicious and satisfying, but no one raises them to the level of art the way that Tauber does.

Tauber is a café and take-away located around Vienna. They have a large variety of these open-face sandwiches (they call them “Brötchen”) on offer, arranged in a glass display case like you see at the Konditoreis.

This is only half the display case.

This is only half the display case.

Curious about why these seemingly simple sandwiches taste so good, I closely examined them. Each sandwich appears to consist of five layers, each layer with flavors that complement the other layers. Not so simple after all! I am going to “deconstruct” as many of these sandwiches as I can so that I (and you) can recreate them at home: they’d be great for a brunch or lunch party.