Neustifter Kirtag

Earlier in the spring I wrote about wine cultivation in Vienna and mentioned the Neustifter Kirtag. (The link to that post is here.) It’s now late August, and the Neustifter Kirtag is happening this weekend. My children’s kindergarten is on the street where the festival is held, and when I went to pick them up yesterday I had to dodge and weave my way through crowds of dirndl- and lederhosen-clad locals. I walked my kids through the festival yesterday and look forward to returning today to eat… well, everything in sight really. How can you blame me when this is some of what is on offer:

A whole cart dedicated to langos -- god bless whomever thought of this.

A whole cart dedicated to langos — god bless whomever thought of this.

They look so sweet until you read what they say. My favorite is "shit pants."

They look so sweet until you read what they say. My favorite is “shit pants.”

Yes

Yes

And hells yes. The Austrians know how to do it.

And hells yes. The Austrians know how to do it.

 

 

 

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Ćevapčići

Ćevapčići

Ćevapčići straight off the grill

The first time I had Ćevapčići I was in Sarajevo and I just assumed they are a Bosnian thing, or perhaps a Balkan thing. I was thus quite surprised by their popularity in Vienna: they can be found in street stands, pre-made in the grocery store, and in some restaurants. In fact, the picture in the header of this blog features Ćevapčići that we enjoyed at Schweizerhaus.

I purchased some of the aforementioned pre-made Ćevapčići at the grocery store and we grilled them this past weekend, which brought the subject to the front of my mind. I did a little research and discovered that Ćevapčići are considered Bosnia and Herzegovina’s national dish, but they are also popular throughout southeast Europe. More importantly, I found some recipes for them.

Ćevapčići with lescó and lángos

Ćevapčići with lescó and lángos

To recreate the above-pictured meal at home, check out my recipe for lescó, recipe for lángos, and stay tuned for a Ćevapčići recipe.

 

Recipe: Lángos

As promised, here is a recipe for lángos. Don’t let the long ingredient list intimidate you: these are super easy to make and very, very tasty.

For the dough:
25 grams (.9 oz) yeast
100 milliliters (3.4 oz) milk, lukewarm
500 grams (18 oz) flour, divided
250 milliliters (8.5 oz) water
20 grams (.7 oz) sugar
5 grams (.18 oz) salt
oil for brushing the dough

For frying: Cooking oil (or lard)

To glaze:
Garlic (peeled and crushed)
Salt
Oil

For serving (optional):
175 grams (6.2 oz) sour cream
Chives
Salt
Pepper

1. Prepare the dough: dissolve the yeast in the lukewarm milk and stir in 100 grams (3.5 oz) flour. Allow to rest covered in a warm place about 30 minutes.

2. After 30 minutes, knead the starter with the remaining dough ingredients (except the brushing oil). Let the finished dough rest in a warm place for 10 minutes.

3. Divide the dough into equal parts weighing about 110 grams (3.9 oz) each and shape into round balls. Place the balls on a lined baking tray, flatten, and brush with a little oil. Let rest at room temperature for half an hour.

4. Peel and crush the garlic, and toss it with oil and salt. Heat the frying oil to 175° C (about 350 F) in a deep pot. While the oil is heating, flatten the dough by hand into flat pancake shapes.

Lángos can be described as "circle-ish," so you really can't go wrong when shaping them.

Lángos can be described as “circle-ish,” so you really can’t go wrong when shaping them.

5. Once the oil is heated, fry the lángos on both sides until both sides are crispy. Drain the fried bread on a paper towel and sprinkle with the garlic/oil mixture.

6. If garnishing, mix the sour cream, chives, salt, and pepper. Add a dollop of this mixture to each piece of lángos.

Tip: You can wrap the oiled dough in foil and freeze it for up to one week without any loss of flavor. Follow the recipe through step 3 and after the dough has rested for 30 minutes, wrap each individual piece of flattened dough in foil. Bring to room temperature before frying.

Enjoy with some wurst and homemade sauerkraut, and of course a cold beer.

Enjoy with some wurst and homemade sauerkraut, and of course a cold beer.

Lángos

Lángos are a Hungarian snack that are also popular in Vienna. They are fried flat bread served fresh out of the hot oil, and my favorite rendition involves a healthy dose of garlic on top. They are pretty much a street food: I’ve seen them at stands in Prater and the zoo, in the Christmas markets, and at my beloved snack shack in the Bauhaus parking lot.

This past weekend I learned that they are also available at the beach, because nothing says “waterside fun” like a large piece of fried bread and a can of beer:

That is my husband showing off the lángos; my arms are not that hairy.

My husband showing off the lángos.

In all seriousness, these are one of my and my childrens’ favorite snacks. Yes, “chidlren” in the plural! Considering the recipe looks easy and I know it’s something everyone in the family will enjoy, I am going to try to make a batch later this week. If all goes well I will share the recipe. Fingers crossed!