Recipe: Powidl Pastries

When I posted my powidl recipe, I said that I would provide further recipes using powidl. One of the recipes I listed was powidltascherl, but when I researched those I discovered they are made with the same potato dough as knoedel (see my recipe for apricot knoedel here). My husband was not a fan of this dough so I improvised the following “how to” for powidl pastries. The grocery stores and konditorei sell pastries like these so they are not something that I invented, and they are (somewhat) authentic.

Ingredients:
powidl
2 packages puff pastry

1. Unroll both packages of puff pastry and stack one on top of the other. (Note: I did not do this when I made the ones in the pictures. As you will see in the final picture, the powidl oozed out of the pastry, which is why I will be using a double-layer of puff pastry in future batches.)

2. Cut the pastry into quarters, and spread some powidl in the center of each quarter.

I could not keep my son from eating the powidl long enough to take a picture.

I could not keep my son from eating the powidl long enough to take a picture.

3. Fold the long sides of the pastry towards the middle, overlapping. Press to seal. Fold both the short sides in and press to seal.

Kinda like folding a letter, but ultimately more delicious.

Kinda like folding a letter, but more delicious.

4. Flip the pastry so the seal is on the bottom. Brush top with melted butter, then cut four slits in the dough to vent. Move to a parchment-lined baking sheet.

More butter is more better.

More butter is more better.

5. Bake at the oven temperature specified on the package of pastry until the pastries are golden and puffy, rotating the pan halfway through baking. (I cooked my pastries at 220 for 15 minutes, and I rotated them after 7 minutes.)

6. Enjoy!

6. Enjoy!

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Recipe: Rote Grütze

800 grams (28 oz) mixed berries (eg strawberries, red and black currants, blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, or cherries)
6 tbsp corn starch
250 milliliters (1 1/6 Cup) cherry juice, divided
50 grams (1.8 oz) sugar
zest of 1 lemon

1.Carefully examine berries, discarding any overripe or rotten fruit. Use only the fleshy part of the fruit: hull the strawberries, remove currants from stem, pit the cherries, etc.

2. Whisk together the corn starch and 5 Tbsp of the juice until smooth.

3. Put all the berries in a large pot and add remaining juice, sugar, and lemon zest. Slowly bring the pot to a boil on the lowest heat setting.

4. Once the mixture starts to bubble, stir in the corn starch/juice combination. Return the jelly to a boil, stirring continuously, then remove the pan from heat once it comes to a full boil.

For reference purposes, my grütze went from this:

Red currant, blackberries, raspberries, and blueberries oh my!

Red currant, blackberries, raspberries, and blueberries oh my!

to this:

"I am going to make your belly so happy..."

“I am going to make your belly so happy…”

The grütze can be served immediately as a warm dessert, or refrigerated overnight and used on its own as a dessert or as a garnish. I think it tastes great mixed with yogurt, mueslix, and pumpkin seeds.

A delicious breakfast

A delicious breakfast

Recipe: Powidl

2 kilograms (71 oz) plums, halved and pitted
200 grams (7.1 oz) caster sugar
1/2 Tbsp cinnamon
peel from 1 lemon
20 milliliters (.7 oz) rum
1. Pour enough water in your stock pot to cover the bottom. Add the halved plums and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer. Slowly boil the plums until they are thick, stirring occasionally, about 6 hours.
2. Towards the end of the boiling, stir in sugar and season to taste with cinnamon, grated lemon peel, and rum. (The measurements given in the ingredients section are the amounts that I used, to my taste.)
For reference purposes, my plums went from this:
Before I turned the heat on.

Before I turned the heat on

to this:

Six hours of boiling, plus some sugar and spices

Six hours of boiling, plus some sugar and spices

Not sure what to do with your powidl? I am going to attempt powidltascherl (a powidl-filled dumpling) and powidl topfen kuchen (a cake with powidl and cream cheese) at some point in the near future. The temperatures are in the 90s and our apartment does not have air conditioning, so I need to wait until a time when my family is not at home and the apartment is cool(er) to do my cooking — probably a morning next week. Stay tuned!

Recipe: Marillenröster

I canned some of the stew, so this jar is not the full yield.

This jar is not the full yield as I canned some stew as well.

Marillenröster is an apricot stew that is served as dessert. It can be served with topfenknoedel, kaiserschmarren, or on its own with cream. This recipe makes two 500 gram (18 oz) glasses:

1 kilogram (36 oz) apricots, quartered and pitted
300 grams (11 oz) granulated sugar
1/2 vanilla pod (or 1/2 tsp vanilla extract)
juice from half a lemon

Simmer all the ingredients in a pot until the fruit has broken down. If you used a vanilla bean, remove it when the stew is finished simmering. Serve warm.

Gusshaus

Twice a year, something magical happens in Austria: Restaurant Week. Dozens of restaurants around the country offer diners a set three-course menu for a very small price (i.e., lunch is 19 Euros). I found it difficult to choose only one restaurant to try for my first Restaurant Week, but not so this time. I’ve been dying to try Gusshaus ever since I first read about it. It boasts food from across the former Habsburg empire, which of course appealed to both the historian and food lover in me.

I got to try a meal at Gusshaus yesterday and it was definitely worth the wait. When I sat down I was greeted with a bowl each of green and black olives, a basket of bread, and a spread that tasted vaguely fishy. (I love fishy-tasting food, so this was a good thing.) I ordered a glass of white wine to go with the meal, and thus the three courses of yumminess began.

Kresseschaumsuppe mit gebratenen Jakobsmuscheln

Kresseschaumsuppe mit gebratenen Jakobsmuscheln

The first course was a bowl of cress “foam” soup with fried scallops. I am not sure exactly what “foam” implies, other than perhaps the soup had neither a clear broth nor a heavy, creamy broth. The scallops were very lightly fried (if at all), and the combination of scallops and cress made for a light and delicious soup.

Mit Waldpilzen gefuelltes Tullnerfelder Jungschwein in einer Pfefferrahmsauce mit Gemuesenudeln

Mit Waldpilzen gefuelltes Tullnerfelder Jungschwein in einer Pfefferrahmsauce mit Gemuesenudeln

The main was a pork cutlet with mushroom filling, served atop noodles with grilled vegetables (carrots and zucchini) and covered in pepper-cream sauce. The meat was cooked perfectly medium-rare and was juicy and tender. The cream sauce was surprisingly light and did not overwhelm the vegetables or noodles. In other words, a fantastic main course that didn’t leave me feeling overly full and nasty.

Topfen-nougat-Knoedel auf Fruchtspiegel

Topfen-nougat-Knoedel auf Fruchtspiegel

And a good thing, too, considering this is what was served as dessert. Knoedels along the lines of the apricot ones that I made, except they were filled with a thick, delicious chocolate cream. They were accompanied by a plum compote, strawberry compote, and sugared mint and lavender. I admit the picture is blurry because I might have been too excited about eating these.

And now I am dreaming about the next Restaurant Week…